A repository of awesome.

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instagram:

@dalek2013 Brings a Splash of Color to the @_smoca

To see more photos of James’ vivid work, visit the Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art location page and follow @dalek2013.

“There is an impact to art in public spaces that can’t be achieved in studio work,” says the artist James Marshall (@dalek2013), who recently completed several massive, colorful murals for the Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art (@_smoca). “Murals allow me to explore ideas and processes that I couldn’t necessarily do in the studio. It’s very liberating.”

When approached by SMoCA, James sought to complement the building’s architecture: “For me filling the space was about working with the framework of what was already there,” he explains. “I wanted the artwork to accentuate the architectural aspects and the existing art in those spaces.”

For James, working at a large scale also has the benefit of informing his smaller paintings. “I think the openness of it brings a lot to me that I can then take back to the studio and incorporate into that work.”

This is making me want to take a trip to Arizona!

Ooh, saffron. Never thought of that for pot pie. Must try.
luckypeach:

For our All You Can Eat issue, our Southeastern Pennsylvania correspondent Mark Ibold took on the buffets of Amish Country—and brought home this recipe.
Chicken Pot Pie
Makes 4 to 6 servings
Chicken Pot Pie is a staple of Pennsylvanian Dutch cooking and a fixture at Amish Country buffets. What we call chicken pot pie in central PA is more like a thick chicken noodle stew, a relative of what they call chicken and dumplings in Edna Lewis’s part of the country. 
1 chicken, 3 to 4 pounds2 to 3 Q chicken broth (store-bought is fine)1 large pinch saffron (like 20 strands)1 C flour2 t baking powder1 t salt (more as needed to season)1 T butter1 egg½ eggshell full of cold water1 small white onion, halved and thinly sliced1 largish Russet potato, peeled, halved lengthwise, and thinly sliced+ fresh ground black pepper
1. Cut up the chicken in pieces, nestle them into a cozy pot, and cover with broth by about an inch. Sprinkle in the saffron, cover with a lid, and bring to a simmer over high heat. Once it has simmered, turn the heat down as low as it’ll go and let the chicken poach for 25 minutes. Then turn the heat off, leave the lid on, and let the pot sit until the chicken is cool enough to handle. 
2. While the chicken is cooling, make the noodles: sift together the flour, baking powder, and salt. Cut in the butter, then work in the eggs and water. As soon as the dough comes together, roll it thin and cut it into 2” by 2” noodles. (I like to make rippled noodles; if you’ve got a wavy-edged rolling cutter, do so.)
3. Move the chicken from the pot to a bowl and bring the broth to a boil over high heat. Add noodles, a handful at a time, stirring well after each addition. The noodles will puff up in a minute or two (and eventually disintegrate to a degree, which is perfectly fine.) Add the onion and potato, stir, and once the broth returns to a boil, reduce the heat to a simmer. Cook until the potatoes are soft and almost breaking up. 
4. While the potatoes are simmering, shred the chicken by hand, and season the meat amply with salt and lots of black pepper. Add it to the pot and let it heat through before serving. 

Ooh, saffron. Never thought of that for pot pie. Must try.

luckypeach:

For our All You Can Eat issue, our Southeastern Pennsylvania correspondent Mark Ibold took on the buffets of Amish Country—and brought home this recipe.

Chicken Pot Pie

Makes 4 to 6 servings

Chicken Pot Pie is a staple of Pennsylvanian Dutch cooking and a fixture at Amish Country buffets. What we call chicken pot pie in central PA is more like a thick chicken noodle stew, a relative of what they call chicken and dumplings in Edna Lewis’s part of the country. 

1 chicken, 3 to 4 pounds
2 to 3 Q chicken broth (store-bought is fine)
1 large pinch saffron (like 20 strands)
1 C flour
2 t baking powder
1 t salt (more as needed to season)
1 T butter
1 egg
½ eggshell full of cold water
1 small white onion, halved and thinly sliced
1 largish Russet potato, peeled, halved lengthwise, and thinly sliced
+ fresh ground black pepper

1. Cut up the chicken in pieces, nestle them into a cozy pot, and cover with broth by about an inch. Sprinkle in the saffron, cover with a lid, and bring to a simmer over high heat. Once it has simmered, turn the heat down as low as it’ll go and let the chicken poach for 25 minutes. Then turn the heat off, leave the lid on, and let the pot sit until the chicken is cool enough to handle. 

2. While the chicken is cooling, make the noodles: sift together the flour, baking powder, and salt. Cut in the butter, then work in the eggs and water. As soon as the dough comes together, roll it thin and cut it into 2” by 2” noodles. (I like to make rippled noodles; if you’ve got a wavy-edged rolling cutter, do so.)

3. Move the chicken from the pot to a bowl and bring the broth to a boil over high heat. Add noodles, a handful at a time, stirring well after each addition. The noodles will puff up in a minute or two (and eventually disintegrate to a degree, which is perfectly fine.) Add the onion and potato, stir, and once the broth returns to a boil, reduce the heat to a simmer. Cook until the potatoes are soft and almost breaking up. 

4. While the potatoes are simmering, shred the chicken by hand, and season the meat amply with salt and lots of black pepper. Add it to the pot and let it heat through before serving. 

sellingthe90s:

1999, Nokia

Ha! This was my first cell phone…with a chrome cover. Ah, the memories of it’s little beep beep noises. :)

sellingthe90s:

1999, Nokia

Ha! This was my first cell phone…with a chrome cover. Ah, the memories of it’s little beep beep noises. :)

In the #tikitikitikiroom! #Disneyland #TikiRoom #myfeethurt

In the #tikitikitikiroom! #Disneyland #TikiRoom #myfeethurt

Mmm, bridge.

Mmm, bridge.

annstreetstudio:

Down-home goodness and southern sophistication come together to make my new must-eat place in Charleston, Husk Restaurant

I must explore Charleston sometime!

midcenturymodernfreak:

Fannin Apartment | Interior Design: Chris Nguyen | Houston, TX - Via

I love the charcoal walls with the wood.

wednesdaydreams:

You don’t exist anymore. You’re not in the system anymore.

The Double (2013), Richard Ayoade

I must see this. How did I miss it?

acehotel:

Downtown Los Angeles
God is in the house.
His reputation and mustache precede him. Nick Cave brings his Bad Seeds to The Theatre at Ace Hotel July 12 — burning down the house with his recent masterpiece Push The Sky Away. We’re losing our minds over here at the chance to host one of music’s most respected elder statesmen — because fortunately in Cave’s case, respected isn’t the same as respectful. 
Tickets hit the street Friday May 9, but lucky for us, we’ve got a special pre-sale code for our friends to make sure we all get to share the experience.
Pre-sale starts today at 10am. Use the code SKYAWAY.
Photo by Andrew Whitton.

Tickets bought, room reserved. That wasn’t much of a decision. SO EXCITED!! After seeing Nick Cave’s recent film 20,000 Days on Earth at SFIFF; my fanhood has been re-kindled.

acehotel:

Downtown Los Angeles

God is in the house.

His reputation and mustache precede him. Nick Cave brings his Bad Seeds to The Theatre at Ace Hotel July 12 — burning down the house with his recent masterpiece Push The Sky Away. We’re losing our minds over here at the chance to host one of music’s most respected elder statesmen — because fortunately in Cave’s case, respected isn’t the same as respectful. 

Tickets hit the street Friday May 9, but lucky for us, we’ve got a special pre-sale code for our friends to make sure we all get to share the experience.

Pre-sale starts today at 10am. Use the code SKYAWAY.

Photo by Andrew Whitton.

Tickets bought, room reserved. That wasn’t much of a decision. SO EXCITED!! After seeing Nick Cave’s recent film 20,000 Days on Earth at SFIFF; my fanhood has been re-kindled.